The “Eh Cuz” Cousin Game

20 Sep

When doing genealogy research you really can’t discount the value of finding cousins (or understanding how you are cousins.)

A cousin is a relative
with whom a person
shares one or more
common ancestors.

Near or far the children of our ancestors and their siblings can be a wealth of connectivity to more information about ourselves and our past, present and future. (okay, maybe I’m waxing poetic.)

But, when I connect to living relatives in a genealogy forum there’s a warm camaraderie of knowing – “eh we related” or “eh we might be cousins”  or at a minimum – “eh we looking for the same people.” This has happened a few times over the last month as I’ve been researching my various lines WAIWAIOLE, MOSS, KAHELE, and as my research wondering/wandering has found cousins who may be able to answer the question about  if there truly is a connection from my Great-Grandmother Violet to the famed cowboy Naluahine KAOPUA which a family scribbled note says was somehow her grandparent. The resemblance is uncanny, though right???

Violet Keawe Hii Ku O Kalai Jennie KAUHANE

b. 1896 Kahaluu, N. Kona d. 1975 Kapaa, Kauai

Father – John Napua KAUHANE Mother – Mary KALAUWALU
married Elia Waiwaiole and resided in Kapaa, Kauai

WAIWAIOLE_Violet

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-20 at 11.04.22 PM

b. March 4, 1870 d. April 13, 1961

 

I’ve connected with a possible cousin half way around the world in Sicily, found a clue as to how my son’s Great-Great-Grandmother MOSS was cousins with William I. KANAKANUI, and found out that several friends I’ve known for years, my niece and also one of my first cousins may be related to my KAHELE line and we may have an opportunity in coming months due to a cousin’s friend visit the ancestral lands in Kaupo where my Great-Grandfather Joseph KAUHIMAKA was born.

This “cousin” warmth and welcoming lei of aloha is NOT limited to genealogy buffs — it is felt by all at celebrations and gatherings in the islands.  A typical scenario may play out like this — you attend a 1st Birthday Lu’au celebration and at the event – you recognize friends, neighbors, former co-workers and ask, “Eh, how come you at this party?” Well the answer so many times turns out to be, “that’s my relatives” and then you say, “Eh, me too, we cousins!”

This same kinda thing happens on Facebook — you comment on your known cousin’s page or see a photo of folks from different parts of your life together and suddenly – a mutual friend is asking how you know each other – and guess what – now you are all cousins…

People worldwide are sending in their swabbed spit samples to get that same “cousin” warmth feeling when 6-8 weeks later their AncestryDNA (currently on sale for $79) or 23andMe report returns with DNA matched relatives.

So where else can you play the cousin game?  Geni.com’s world tree has an interesting feature for cousin matching with their Master Profiles of famous celebrities living and passed on…So once you’ve got some critical mass of ancestors and branches on your tree that you load/build there – then you can search for a Master Profile and see if it tells you “You are connected” then you can click a step further to see the relationship path.

Screen Shot 2017-09-20 at 9.42.24 PM

It’s loads of hours of potential fun (no really my son and I had hours of fun searching our favorite celebs) – to see just how many famous people you are related to and how closely – like 44th President Barack Obama – my 15th cousin,  Justin Drew Bieber – my 20th cousin, or Taylor Swift – my 11th cousin twice removed or Walt Disney – my 13th cousin thrice removed.  (Will this qualify me for Club33?)

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Updating & Sharing Genealogy

3 Jul

Again — it’s been a long while since a post here — I have been busy making great discoveries and serendipitous connections in many different brick walls for Kauhimaka, Waiwaiole and Ayres/Moss trees – but the last 4-6 months what’s consumed me is a special family reunion project for our upcoming Kauhimaka ‘Ohana Reunion in the Ahupua’a of Malaekahana, Oahu July 5-8th. 

When the last major “book” released on your family tree was put together in 1983 — there’s some really big shoes and gaps in information to fill to create an update.  It’s a hard act to follow – for those who were there and remember the multi-media slideshow presentation that took us through years of research into trying to answer the question, “Who was the real father of Joseph Kauhimaka?” that was given at the 1983 reunion along with the book (now a sacred treasure for decades) full of family data sheets and black & white xerox photo collages.

This year we’re going to be low-tech – outdoors and on a tight timeline — so no dimming of lights and raising the screen – no 30-40 minute presentation.  Yet it has to have substance, accuracy, timelessness, be visual, entertaining – and a keepsake. Where do you start? What should the result of the work look like, feel like, taste like / smell like and where can we download it afterward?

All good questions to ponder, but when it comes to brass-tax what matters is trying to NOT leave anyone out — you have to hit the ground knocking on doors (Facebook timelines and/or email boxes) asking, begging, pleading, stalking for updates JUST to gather all the births, deaths, marriages, divorces, adoptions, and step-relations that have grown the tree in the last 34 years.

That’s multi-generational GAP – three NEW generations actually.

Family tree sketch for your design.jpg

So about 12 years ago — I took that 1983 book and digitized it in Geni.com record by record building a tree and as Geni started to change their “free” model I realized the value of all the work I’d done and sprung for a one-time lifetime membership — to ‘secure’ it for posterity.  Sporadically and organically – I’d grow it as first birthday and birth announcements, wedding invitations, etc. would come about.  But there’s still the distant cousins who live away who you don’t see often, that uncle who just never comes to anything and nobody has seen in years, and the “I think maybe they moved, but nobody really knows – maybe they had kids.”

So what is one to do?  The age of social media helped in a few ways — allowing a way to connect with those faraway cousins who were just a name in the tree – with now a face, and a timeline to their life, photos of their keiki, their special moments and their mo’opuna – the 21st century way to get to know each other via likes, selfies and emojis.

Another great help was a “nucleus” of ‘ohana members focused on a common goal for the last year — planning a reunion gathering.  This set an agenda, a goal, a timeline for completion – and urgency for folks to actually provide their updates.  A pipeline of excitement as it were culminating in the reunion event now only days away.

1983_Reunion-Book_261789_10150297052764673_996460_n

1983 Kauhimaka ‘Aha ‘Ohana Reunion Book with 2010 Updates Sheets at a Mini-Reunion at Ko’olina – and Grandparent Photos Lino & Marilyn Fernandez

But the “descendants” document is just one thing — a list of names/dates – how can your presentation be more?  Due to personal tribulations and recent illness — the finish line is here and all the good ideas of what the document would be (a recipe book, collection of stories, photos, source documents) – are just that — good ideas — so it will be a work-in-progress as it should be – ever-growing, ever-updating and ever-finessing.  Hoping it will be as originally planned a collaboration as well with other contributors invested in its ongoing completion and nurturing.

In the last 30 days alone – I’ve corrected 100s of profiles in my Geni tree, added other facts, obituaries and added dozens of new family members. Talked with and exchanged photos, stories with ‘ohana near and far.  Collectively, the descendants report is now at 317 records spanning seven generations and a history since the mid-1800s. With 5 living generations — our eldest surviving descendant is nearing her 89th birthday and the youngest descendant is just a mere 6 months old. Perhaps by Wednesday — my deadline to hit print – we’ll be past 320 recorded descendants.

Some goals at the reunion will be to collect some oral histories, take lots of photos of ‘ohana, be in the moment and receive the “present” of being together, singing and communing as one. I’m looking forward to all the honi, hugs and tears of joy as we join hands in the lo’i patch, weaving lauhala, pulling in the fishing nets and creating the living lei that binds us to one another.

So what will be the takeaways?  I’ll bring some hard copies of the book in progress to share with each family line and take an email list signup for sharing a Google Drive to the PDFs post the event and my dream of a signup for ongoing family genealogy meetups /adventures in the future.  Maybe some ShakinTrees.com calling cards.  And perhaps some genealogy tools (various worksheets – like pedigree charts, fan charts) and a survey to gather ideas for another pet project to create a MyGoogle Maps for significant locations to our family (Kaupo, Waialeale, Ma’eMa’e Chapel & Cemetery, Kawaihao Seminary for Girls, Kapena Stream, etc.).

Even though the end result won’t be as amazing as I had originally envisioned, it will still be awesome — it’s my family – my ‘ohana and I am humbled.

Baby Lino’s Loves and Legacy

2 Aug Lino Fernandez II & Phillipa Fernandez

The biography of my beloved Papa Lino Fernandez III was written in 2003 for sharing at the Kauhimaka Reunion held that year at Makaha resort.  I’ve updated the descendant counts….since the last 12 years the Lino & Marilyn Fernandez clan has been fruitful and multiplied.

———————–

Biography of Lino Fernandez III – written by Lino Fernandez IV June 2003

BIRTH-
Lino Fernandez III, was born on May 21, 1920 to Lino and Phillipa Fernandez.  He was the sixth child and the fourth son.  He assumed the name Lino Fernandez Jr. when his father assumed the name Lino Fernandez Sr. after his father died.  He was also affectionately known as “Baby Lino”, dad, daddy, uncle Lino, grandpa, and papa.  According to his birth certificate, the family was living on Alewa Drive at the time of his birth.

SCHOOL-
He grew up in the Liliha, Kaimuki, and Punahou areas of Honolulu.   He attended public schools, and skipped a grade during his elementary school years.  As verified by his diplomas, he graduated from Liliuokalani Intermediate School in June of 1934 and McKinley High School in June of 1937, at age 17.   He excelled in school taking some business courses and attained the rank of Captain in JROTC.

Lino Fernandez III receives the NCO of the Year Award - Hawaii Air National Guard (IMG_1935)

Lino Fernandez III receives the NCO of the Year Award – Hawaii Air National Guard (IMG_1935)

WORK-
After high school he continued helping the family by selling papers for the ”Fernandez Newsboys” and working at Hawaiian Pine and for various construction companies.  He began working at Pearl Harbor Shipyard around 1940, and became a journeyman shipwright (carpenter). He along with some of his brothers served their country on December 7, 1941 aiding in emergency and firefighting work. He also served with the U.S. Merchant Marines sailing a couple of trips as an oiler/wiper. In 1949 he left Pearl Harbor and joined the Hawaii Air National Guard.  He was able to attend several service schools throughout the mainland and was also able to travel around the country.  He also attended a NCO Academy at Tachikawa AFB in Japan.  Lino was known as a very dedicated and helpful public servant in the Air Guard where he served as a full time technician for 21 years until he retired in September 1970. He was awarded The Outstanding NCO of the Year in 1968.  When he retired he was the Material Facilities (warehouse) Supervisor.  After retiring from the Air Guard he went to work for the State of Hawaii, (Department of Transportation, Highways Division), as part of the newly created Bridge Maintenance crew.  He retired from the State in May 1975.

FAMILY-
Lino married Marilyn Hann Jin Lee on July 26. 1941.   They met at MaeMae Sunday School where both of their families attended.  They first lived in the Fernandez Court on Metcalf  St., and in 1952 moved to the family home at St. Louis Hts. located at Alencastre Pl.  This house was built by Lino and his brothers.  They had four children Uarda Kanani (2/2/42), Lynette Lee Momona (4/13/44), Lino IV (11/20/47) and Lee Keolalani (6/17/58).  After Marilyn passed away Lino remarried
twice —  Harriet Napuunoa (1962) and Harriet Hisayo Rita (1969).

Lino passed away on Jan. 12, 1977, in his home at St. Louis Hts.  He is survived by his four children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren , and 12 great-grandchildren.

[UPDATE – July 2015 — He is survived by four children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren.]

PERSONALITY-
To summarize his life and personality I would like to share some of Lino’s Loves;

Loved his family; very caring, strict but fair,  always provided for his family.

Loved the Lord; attended Kaumakapili, and MaeMae, served as Trustee, sang in choir, helped with various projects i. e. luaus, carnivals, sweet bread and pickled onion sales.

Loved to read; Bible, newspapers, magazines to keep up with current events.

Loved sports; played football (H. S. and Air Guard), played softball (Hawaiian Pine, Air Guard and church), played golf, enjoyed watching sports, watched his sons play football, baseball and wrestle, watched high school , college (U. H.) and professional football games here in Hawaii and on the mainland (Kezar Stadium, S.F.), he also enjoyed watching sports on TV, he even played hooky from drill to watch the first “live” college game from the mainland.

Loved to party, hosted many family parties and also parties for his co-workers.

Loved to help others, he was always willing to help others with projects, church repairs, rental repairs, and helped several friend and family with repairs/remodels, helped on the kalua pig crew for many luaus.  He also helped in various community projects, including fund raising for the American Cancer Society, Heart Association, and Easter Seals.

Loved to counsel young people, he was very close to his troops from the Air Guard, he was proud to refer to them as “my boys”, he always treated them with respect and was able to get 100 % effort from them and he helped many of them with their training requirements for their jobs and also for personal matters.

He provided these same qualities to his family and can be remembered for always being willing to help us and being able to provide guidance.  He always had a good sense of humor and was very generous.  We surely miss him , hopefully some of his traits have carried on to his children and grandchildren.

Mahalo and Aloha to you dad.

A Hawaiian Lady – Ellen Kamae

25 Jul

Ellen Kamae was a half sister of Joseph Kauhimaka my Great-great-grandfather through my FERNANDEZ line. They shared the same mother Anahua.  She was born in April 1858 and died at the age of 70 in March 1929.

Ellen falls into the history books due to her marriage to the prominent Chinese merchant Goo Kim Fui (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goo_Kim_Fui). He came to Hawaii in 1867 and married Ellen in 1872. Mr. & Mrs. Goo Kim were members of the Bethel Church under the pastorate of the Rev. Dr. Damon. Source: Annual Report, Volume 86 by the Hawaiian Evangelical Association “A Pioneer Chinese Christian”

Together they had the following children: Annie A., Ella S.Y.  and John K..  Annie and Ella took up teaching positions at Royal School and Kaahumanu Elementary respectively and were also very active in the operations of the Aala Sunday School their father pastored. (1910 US Census)

She is in the 1900 Census as Kamae Goo and her husband as Kim Goo.  It states that she had four children with only two living… so will have to uncover where Ella comes in as only Annie and John are listed as children.. There are a few other children listed as a neice and boarder.. so perhaps one of these children were hanai’d or adopted as their own later.  Ellen’s brother Joe Kauhimaka, sister Kuhihewa married to Aaron KANAI, and her mother Anahua are in nearby households.

Goo Kim Fui and my great-great-grandfather LEE Toma were from the same province of China.  Goo Kim was a contemporary and friend of LEE Toma which shows the link between my LEE and KAUHIMAKA lines much earlier in Honolulu history then the meeting of my Great-grandmother’s at Ma’eMa’e Chapel which later led to the marriage of their children / my grandparents Marilyn Han Jin LEE and Lino FERNANDEZ III.

Both LEE Toma and Goo Kim Fui are buried at Makiki Cemetery in the Chinese Christian section. Goo Kim Fui precedes Ellen in death in 1908. He and Ellen Kamae are buried in a gated section on the lower walkway near the Wilder Street Corner.  Their son John Kameeualani Yin Fook Goo Kim (1889 – 1963) is also in the family cemetery plot in a nearby grave.

Headstones at Makiki Cemetery of Ellen & Goo Kim Fui

Headstones at Makiki Cemetery of Ellen & Goo Kim Fui

She was a remarkable woman dedicated to her husband’s Christian values in uplifting the Chinese community and building the Chinese Christian faith and following in Honolulu and beyond.  She learned his language and traveled with him to Leen Tong to erect a church.

“Mrs. Goo Kim accommodated herself to this change in life and work so gracefully as to make a strong impression upon her husband’s country folk.” Source: The Friend, Volume LXV, Number 6, 1 June 1908 Edition 01 – The State of Hawaii.

An influencer in the elite circles of Honolulu life – Ellen’s prowess stood on its own and afforded her invites to the most posh events like those hosted by the Dillinghams or Queen Liliuoukalani.  She hosted her own share of gala events like her husband’s 60th birthday bash in their Nuuanu home (on Liliha between Judd and Wylie).  Ellen could often be found traveling with the who’s who of Honolulu on occasions like an impromptu lava viewing excursion aboard the steamer Kinau.


Other Sources & References

1878 – pupils for the Sabbath School at Makiki are from Mr. Goo Kim’s rice field in Waikiki.

http://books.google.com/books?id=VkgQAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA5-PA43&lpg=RA5-PA43&dq=ellen+goo+kim&source=bl&ots=DiAixy9VAH&sig=dyGhrGqYNL_CthVPVhVLdErhLhI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=SQKiUbqoOaHhiAKF7IHoCw&ved=0CFIQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=ellen%20goo%20kim&f=false

——-

1880 – Property Ownership – Transfer of deed  [IMAGE]  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cosmorific/4716330473/

Transfer of deed….
Mika Kauhao to Samuel Smith, then Samuel Smith to Ellen Kamae Goo Kim on Feb. 20, 1880, 4pm.

——-

1887 – Lava Flow viewing excursion aboard the Kinau – but too late for the show from madam Pele

The daily herald. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands), 07 Feb. 1887. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047239/1887-02-07/ed-1/seq-2/>

 ——-

1897 – Goo Kim’s 60th Birthday Dinner — hosted lunch for the Chinese ladies as thanks at their home on Nuuanu Avenue

The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]), 22 Oct. 1897. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1897-10-22/ed-1/seq-1/>

 ——-

1904 Children: Daughters help with Sunday School at AALA MISSION.

books.google.com/books?id=vV69FuG6oQcC

——-

1905 – Mention of daughter Annie Goo Kim

The Independent. (Honolulu, H.I.), 07 July 1905. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047097/1905-07-07/ed-1/seq-4/>

 ——-

1908 –

The Friend, Volume LXV, Number 6, 1 June 1908 Edition 01 — THE STATE OF HAWAII. [ARTICLE+ILLUSTRATION]
http://books.google.com/books?id=m-HkAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA12&lpg=RA2-PA12&dq=Ellen+kamae+honolulu&source=bl&ots=mBtYTxJ2YN&sig=4r4CUudhrwakVs4cJAdyKMPknU4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=tPuhUbTjOOGliQLuiYCQAQ&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Ellen%20kamae%20honolulu&f=false

he married a Hawaiian lady, Miss Ellen Kamae, a most fortunate and happy union. Mrs. Goo Kim set herself to learn her husband’s language and succeeded remarkably well.

In — therefore he and his wife went to Leen Tong and labored with such success that he was soon enabled to erect a Church building, for which he himself paid,and to gather a number of converts. Mrs. Goo Kim accommodated herself to this change in life and work so gracefully as to make a strong impression upon her husband’s country folk. After…years of successful evangelism the exigencies of business called Mr. and Mrs. Goo Kim back to Honolulu.

——-

1908 – Mrs. Goo Kim — aboard the Bethel Street Workers Reunite Train Ride and Dinner party hosted by the Dillinghams

Evening bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii), 04 June 1908. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1908-06-04/ed-1/seq-4/>

 ——-
1913 – At Queen Lilioukalani’s 75th birthday at Washington Palace:

Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii), 06 Sept. 1913. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-09-06/ed-1/seq-13/>

Veiled Eyes

26 May

one of the surnames in my family tree is KAUHIMAKA. My 2xGreat-Grandfather Joseph Kauhimaka was born in Hana, Maui. The story is he was born out of wedlock. His mother, Anahua, had children from many other couplings as well sometimes married – sometimes not.

We’ve always been told KAUHIMAKA means “veiled eyes” and the explanation was it meant ashamed because of the circumstance of his illegitimate birth.. However, yesterday I had an ‘aha’ moment when i learned of something called a ‘veiled birth’ where the child is born partially or completely enclosed in an unbroken or barely broken amniotic sac also called the ‘caul’ …

Fewer than 1 in 80,000 births occur this way. Sometimes the child will have a veil of the membrane over their head and eyes… hmmm. Perhaps the name was given more literally…

Thoughts?

Hits & Misses in the 1940 Census

17 May

I’ve had a few successes and a few disappointments in searching the 1940 Census as I search for MY PEOPLE.

I have mixed feelings about the ED 2-129 where i found in the last few images of the district the Kalihi Street Orphanage hoping to catch up with Hazel, Joseph and Walter Fernandes who were there in 1930. I guess maybe I’m happy they are no longer in the orphanage – but then where are they?

The Countdown is Over – Ancestry and Others have the 1940 Census

1 Apr

Ancestry.com released the following alert:

After a 72-year wait, the 1940 U.S. Census

is now available to the public.

At 12:01 a.m. ET Ancestry.com picked up the 1940 U.S. Federal Census from the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Now we’re working behind the scenes to get those images – all 3.8 million of them – to you as quickly as possible.

Stay tuned and watch your email. We’ll let you know as soon as the first images are available later today.

And visit www.ancestry.com/1940-census to learn more the 1940 census and finding your family in 1940.

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FamilySearch.org has a dedicated site seeking volunteers to help with the indexing project of the 1940 Census to make the images available to the public for FREE:

https://the1940census.com/?cid=fsHomeT1940HelpText

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Archives.com has published a must-see infographic that shows you how to find your family in the 1940 census April 2! You don’t want to miss this.

Check it out at http://www.archives.com/blog/us-census/archives-1940-census.htmland share with everyone you know looking forward to the 1940 census release!
1940 census archives.com

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