Baby Lino’s Loves and Legacy

2 Aug Lino Fernandez II & Phillipa Fernandez

The biography of my beloved Papa Lino Fernandez III was written in 2003 for sharing at the Kauhimaka Reunion held that year at Makaha resort.  I’ve updated the descendant counts….since the last 12 years the Lino & Marilyn Fernandez clan has been fruitful and multiplied.

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Biography of Lino Fernandez III – written by Lino Fernandez IV June 2003

BIRTH-
Lino Fernandez III, was born on May 21, 1920 to Lino and Phillipa Fernandez.  He was the sixth child and the fourth son.  He assumed the name Lino Fernandez Jr. when his father assumed the name Lino Fernandez Sr. after his father died.  He was also affectionately known as “Baby Lino”, dad, daddy, uncle Lino, grandpa, and papa.  According to his birth certificate, the family was living on Alewa Drive at the time of his birth.

SCHOOL-
He grew up in the Liliha, Kaimuki, and Punahou areas of Honolulu.   He attended public schools, and skipped a grade during his elementary school years.  As verified by his diplomas, he graduated from Liliuokalani Intermediate School in June of 1934 and McKinley High School in June of 1937, at age 17.   He excelled in school taking some business courses and attained the rank of Captain in JROTC.

Lino Fernandez III receives the NCO of the Year Award - Hawaii Air National Guard (IMG_1935)

Lino Fernandez III receives the NCO of the Year Award – Hawaii Air National Guard (IMG_1935)

WORK-
After high school he continued helping the family by selling papers for the ”Fernandez Newsboys” and working at Hawaiian Pine and for various construction companies.  He began working at Pearl Harbor Shipyard around 1940, and became a journeyman shipwright (carpenter). He along with some of his brothers served their country on December 7, 1941 aiding in emergency and firefighting work. He also served with the U.S. Merchant Marines sailing a couple of trips as an oiler/wiper. In 1949 he left Pearl Harbor and joined the Hawaii Air National Guard.  He was able to attend several service schools throughout the mainland and was also able to travel around the country.  He also attended a NCO Academy at Tachikawa AFB in Japan.  Lino was known as a very dedicated and helpful public servant in the Air Guard where he served as a full time technician for 21 years until he retired in September 1970. He was awarded The Outstanding NCO of the Year in 1968.  When he retired he was the Material Facilities (warehouse) Supervisor.  After retiring from the Air Guard he went to work for the State of Hawaii, (Department of Transportation, Highways Division), as part of the newly created Bridge Maintenance crew.  He retired from the State in May 1975.

FAMILY-
Lino married Marilyn Hann Jin Lee on July 26. 1941.   They met at MaeMae Sunday School where both of their families attended.  They first lived in the Fernandez Court on Metcalf  St., and in 1952 moved to the family home at St. Louis Hts. located at Alencastre Pl.  This house was built by Lino and his brothers.  They had four children Uarda Kanani (2/2/42), Lynette Lee Momona (4/13/44), Lino IV (11/20/47) and Lee Keolalani (6/17/58).  After Marilyn passed away Lino remarried
twice —  Harriet Napuunoa (1962) and Harriet Hisayo Rita (1969).

Lino passed away on Jan. 12, 1977, in his home at St. Louis Hts.  He is survived by his four children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren , and 12 great-grandchildren.

[UPDATE – July 2015 — He is survived by four children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren.]

PERSONALITY-
To summarize his life and personality I would like to share some of Lino’s Loves;

Loved his family; very caring, strict but fair,  always provided for his family.

Loved the Lord; attended Kaumakapili, and MaeMae, served as Trustee, sang in choir, helped with various projects i. e. luaus, carnivals, sweet bread and pickled onion sales.

Loved to read; Bible, newspapers, magazines to keep up with current events.

Loved sports; played football (H. S. and Air Guard), played softball (Hawaiian Pine, Air Guard and church), played golf, enjoyed watching sports, watched his sons play football, baseball and wrestle, watched high school , college (U. H.) and professional football games here in Hawaii and on the mainland (Kezar Stadium, S.F.), he also enjoyed watching sports on TV, he even played hooky from drill to watch the first “live” college game from the mainland.

Loved to party, hosted many family parties and also parties for his co-workers.

Loved to help others, he was always willing to help others with projects, church repairs, rental repairs, and helped several friend and family with repairs/remodels, helped on the kalua pig crew for many luaus.  He also helped in various community projects, including fund raising for the American Cancer Society, Heart Association, and Easter Seals.

Loved to counsel young people, he was very close to his troops from the Air Guard, he was proud to refer to them as “my boys”, he always treated them with respect and was able to get 100 % effort from them and he helped many of them with their training requirements for their jobs and also for personal matters.

He provided these same qualities to his family and can be remembered for always being willing to help us and being able to provide guidance.  He always had a good sense of humor and was very generous.  We surely miss him , hopefully some of his traits have carried on to his children and grandchildren.

Mahalo and Aloha to you dad.

A Hawaiian Lady – Ellen Kamae

25 Jul

Ellen Kamae was a half sister of Joseph Kauhimaka my Great-great-grandfather through my FERNANDEZ line. They shared the same mother Anahua.  She was born in April 1858 and died at the age of 70 in March 1929.

Ellen falls into the history books due to her marriage to the prominent Chinese merchant Goo Kim Fui (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goo_Kim_Fui). He came to Hawaii in 1867 and married Ellen in 1872. Mr. & Mrs. Goo Kim were members of the Bethel Church under the pastorate of the Rev. Dr. Damon. Source: Annual Report, Volume 86 by the Hawaiian Evangelical Association “A Pioneer Chinese Christian”

Together they had the following children: Annie A., Ella S.Y.  and John K..  Annie and Ella took up teaching positions at Royal School and Kaahumanu Elementary respectively and were also very active in the operations of the Aala Sunday School their father pastored. (1910 US Census)

She is in the 1900 Census as Kamae Goo and her husband as Kim Goo.  It states that she had four children with only two living… so will have to uncover where Ella comes in as only Annie and John are listed as children.. There are a few other children listed as a neice and boarder.. so perhaps one of these children were hanai’d or adopted as their own later.  Ellen’s brother Joe Kauhimaka, sister Kuhihewa married to Aaron KANAI, and her mother Anahua are in nearby households.

Goo Kim Fui and my great-great-grandfather LEE Toma were from the same province of China.  Goo Kim was a contemporary and friend of LEE Toma which shows the link between my LEE and KAUHIMAKA lines much earlier in Honolulu history then the meeting of my Great-grandmother’s at Ma’eMa’e Chapel which later led to the marriage of their children / my grandparents Marilyn Han Jin LEE and Lino FERNANDEZ III.

Both LEE Toma and Goo Kim Fui are buried at Makiki Cemetery in the Chinese Christian section. Goo Kim Fui precedes Ellen in death in 1908. He and Ellen Kamae are buried in a gated section on the lower walkway near the Wilder Street Corner.  Their son John Kameeualani Yin Fook Goo Kim (1889 – 1963) is also in the family cemetery plot in a nearby grave.

Headstones at Makiki Cemetery of Ellen & Goo Kim Fui

Headstones at Makiki Cemetery of Ellen & Goo Kim Fui

She was a remarkable woman dedicated to her husband’s Christian values in uplifting the Chinese community and building the Chinese Christian faith and following in Honolulu and beyond.  She learned his language and traveled with him to Leen Tong to erect a church.

“Mrs. Goo Kim accommodated herself to this change in life and work so gracefully as to make a strong impression upon her husband’s country folk.” Source: The Friend, Volume LXV, Number 6, 1 June 1908 Edition 01 – The State of Hawaii.

An influencer in the elite circles of Honolulu life – Ellen’s prowess stood on its own and afforded her invites to the most posh events like those hosted by the Dillinghams or Queen Liliuoukalani.  She hosted her own share of gala events like her husband’s 60th birthday bash in their Nuuanu home (on Liliha between Judd and Wylie).  Ellen could often be found traveling with the who’s who of Honolulu on occasions like an impromptu lava viewing excursion aboard the steamer Kinau.


Other Sources & References

1878 – pupils for the Sabbath School at Makiki are from Mr. Goo Kim’s rice field in Waikiki.

http://books.google.com/books?id=VkgQAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA5-PA43&lpg=RA5-PA43&dq=ellen+goo+kim&source=bl&ots=DiAixy9VAH&sig=dyGhrGqYNL_CthVPVhVLdErhLhI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=SQKiUbqoOaHhiAKF7IHoCw&ved=0CFIQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=ellen%20goo%20kim&f=false

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1880 – Property Ownership – Transfer of deed  [IMAGE]  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cosmorific/4716330473/

Transfer of deed….
Mika Kauhao to Samuel Smith, then Samuel Smith to Ellen Kamae Goo Kim on Feb. 20, 1880, 4pm.

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1887 – Lava Flow viewing excursion aboard the Kinau – but too late for the show from madam Pele

The daily herald. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands), 07 Feb. 1887. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047239/1887-02-07/ed-1/seq-2/>

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1897 – Goo Kim’s 60th Birthday Dinner — hosted lunch for the Chinese ladies as thanks at their home on Nuuanu Avenue

The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]), 22 Oct. 1897. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1897-10-22/ed-1/seq-1/>

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1904 Children: Daughters help with Sunday School at AALA MISSION.

books.google.com/books?id=vV69FuG6oQcC

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1905 – Mention of daughter Annie Goo Kim

The Independent. (Honolulu, H.I.), 07 July 1905. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047097/1905-07-07/ed-1/seq-4/>

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1908 –

The Friend, Volume LXV, Number 6, 1 June 1908 Edition 01 — THE STATE OF HAWAII. [ARTICLE+ILLUSTRATION]
http://books.google.com/books?id=m-HkAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA12&lpg=RA2-PA12&dq=Ellen+kamae+honolulu&source=bl&ots=mBtYTxJ2YN&sig=4r4CUudhrwakVs4cJAdyKMPknU4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=tPuhUbTjOOGliQLuiYCQAQ&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Ellen%20kamae%20honolulu&f=false

he married a Hawaiian lady, Miss Ellen Kamae, a most fortunate and happy union. Mrs. Goo Kim set herself to learn her husband’s language and succeeded remarkably well.

In — therefore he and his wife went to Leen Tong and labored with such success that he was soon enabled to erect a Church building, for which he himself paid,and to gather a number of converts. Mrs. Goo Kim accommodated herself to this change in life and work so gracefully as to make a strong impression upon her husband’s country folk. After…years of successful evangelism the exigencies of business called Mr. and Mrs. Goo Kim back to Honolulu.

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1908 – Mrs. Goo Kim — aboard the Bethel Street Workers Reunite Train Ride and Dinner party hosted by the Dillinghams

Evening bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii), 04 June 1908. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82016413/1908-06-04/ed-1/seq-4/>

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1913 – At Queen Lilioukalani’s 75th birthday at Washington Palace:

Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii), 06 Sept. 1913. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-09-06/ed-1/seq-13/>

Veiled Eyes

26 May

one of the surnames in my family tree is KAUHIMAKA. My 2xGreat-Grandfather Joseph Kauhimaka was born in Hana, Maui. The story is he was born out of wedlock. His mother, Anahua, had children from many other couplings as well sometimes married – sometimes not.

We’ve always been told KAUHIMAKA means “veiled eyes” and the explanation was it meant ashamed because of the circumstance of his illegitimate birth.. However, yesterday I had an ‘aha’ moment when i learned of something called a ‘veiled birth’ where the child is born partially or completely enclosed in an unbroken or barely broken amniotic sac also called the ‘caul’ …

Fewer than 1 in 80,000 births occur this way. Sometimes the child will have a veil of the membrane over their head and eyes… hmmm. Perhaps the name was given more literally…

Thoughts?

Hits & Misses in the 1940 Census

17 May

I’ve had a few successes and a few disappointments in searching the 1940 Census as I search for MY PEOPLE.

I have mixed feelings about the ED 2-129 where i found in the last few images of the district the Kalihi Street Orphanage hoping to catch up with Hazel, Joseph and Walter Fernandes who were there in 1930. I guess maybe I’m happy they are no longer in the orphanage – but then where are they?

The Countdown is Over – Ancestry and Others have the 1940 Census

1 Apr

Ancestry.com released the following alert:

After a 72-year wait, the 1940 U.S. Census

is now available to the public.

At 12:01 a.m. ET Ancestry.com picked up the 1940 U.S. Federal Census from the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Now we’re working behind the scenes to get those images – all 3.8 million of them – to you as quickly as possible.

Stay tuned and watch your email. We’ll let you know as soon as the first images are available later today.

And visit www.ancestry.com/1940-census to learn more the 1940 census and finding your family in 1940.

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FamilySearch.org has a dedicated site seeking volunteers to help with the indexing project of the 1940 Census to make the images available to the public for FREE:

https://the1940census.com/?cid=fsHomeT1940HelpText

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Archives.com has published a must-see infographic that shows you how to find your family in the 1940 census April 2! You don’t want to miss this.

Check it out at http://www.archives.com/blog/us-census/archives-1940-census.htmland share with everyone you know looking forward to the 1940 census release!
1940 census archives.com

Feeling Lucky

24 Mar

Last week’s St. Patrick’s Day holiday was ever sweeter as I could proudly wear a “Kiss Me I’m Irish” shamrock — knowing it was true…This was the first day of wearin’ the green that I knew for certain I’m a wee bit Irish. Recent research revealed at least two “gateway” ancestors who emigrated from Ireland.  Both are through my Whitfield/Brown line.  Both were probably from Northern Ireland’s Ulster – which probably makes them “Scotch-Irish.”

The first was Mollie Browne circa 1712 – 1824. Mollie Browne emigrated to Bedford, Virginia with her Irish husband John Browne. He died soon after their arrival leaving behind an orphan son Richard Browne. Mollie remarried soon after John’s death to Joseph Underwood in 1730  who later settled the family in Rutherford, North Carolina. I am descended from Mollie’s daughter Elizabeth Underwood. Mollie is my 7x-Great-Grandmother.

My second Irish ancestor that I’ve found is Samuel King, Sr.  He married Elizabeth Underwood Davenport – Mollie Browne’s daughter. Her marriage to Samuel was Elizabeth’s second marriage.  Samuel was born in 1746 and arrived to America from Ireland with his brother Joseph and sister Elizabeth.

In 1770 Samuel purchased 200 acres along the North Carolina/South Carolina border which had a high hill that became known as King’s Mountain. Later on October 7, 1780, the “Battle of King’s Mountain” occurred between Major Ferguson’s troops and around 1,000 southern mountaineers making this family namesake a pivotal location in the war. Samuel King enlisted December 9, 1776, as a Private in Co. K, 11th Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army commanded by Col. Daniel Morgan. He was captured at Germantown and listed as a prisoner on a muster roll call October 14, 1777. He apparently escaped and appeared on the Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania muster roll on February 17, 1778, in Camp Valley Forge under General George Washington. Samuel is my 6x-Great-Grandfather.

I’ve spent more time learning about each of these ancestors and their families and taking in my Irish heritage and culture.  I’ve always been a fan of Irish fare, drink and a good shanty being lucky to have some great Irish pubs here in Honolulu like Murphy’s (my fave), O’Toole’s and the Irish Rose… so I tried my hand at making my first Irish Guinness Stew and adapted several recipes I found online.  The end product was a savory slow-cooked stew that packed lots of flavor with some interesting ingredients I didn’t expect like chocolate, brown sugar, and honey to counter the bitter potential of the single bottle of Guinness Extra Stout.  The remaining bottles of Guinness were paired with a Single Shot Pale Ale to make “Black and Tans”.

To learn a little Irish language  and song — I listened to a crash course of Michael O’Laughlin’s Hello Fada and also the Irish Song and Recitation podcasts. Here’s a favorite I discovered – “Oro Se” a 17th century standard and often a beginner’s first song to learn.

Research Ramblings – brick by brick and brick walls

28 Feb

Been busy with field research continuing at MaeMae Cemetery in Puunui. Nearly finished with photographing all the headstones and still have to transcribe to my spreadsheet. Then to compare to the items found in digital archives of other known burials to the site. Still need to map the stones and reach out to Kaumakapili Church to see what records and information they might have as well as sharing my research with them.

I’m also spending much time in Facebook Groups – like Helu Papa Kūʻauhau and also the Native Hawaiian Genealogy Society (NHGSoc) page. Another useful resource has been the group Portuguese Hawaiian Genealogy. The camaraderie of the groups is infectious and there are many ‘ohana connections.

Spent some time learning more of my North Carolina roots – and learned that some of my ancestors and family were brick makers and instrumental in building and supplying the brick for buildings like the Mills River Chapel Methodist church. The Chapel is one of a few antebellum churches in Henderson County and the only one used for worship since its construction. The King family farm passed this craft down through generations. Building more family history – brick by brick.

Looking forward to the Akana ‘Ohana reunion coming up in mid-July and will be returning to Hilo where my Great-Great-Grandparents Wong Sing Akana and Kaili Kaapuiki made their home. My Great-Grandmother Ami Akana Lee was the eldest child. It will be exciting to meet many distant cousins in person for the first time after months of corresponding online.

Finally a brick wall has been busted — and I’ll post a more detailed article about this find. In September, I discovered that Virginia K. Ayres – my husband’s great-grandmother – had a blood connection to the name KAMA. It turns out her birth father was known as Kama. Well I ran the search again on Chronicling America and a new article came up this time “Missing Girl has been found” … with his first name and the brother’s first name. Very exciting and now some concrete material to continue the search to find her blood kin and perhaps more of her story.

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