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Waikahalulu

12 Apr

My ancestor 3xgreatgrandfather Kanohokai was a Mahiʻai who tended a loʻi at Kapena near Judd. I recently found his marriage record to Momona 3xgreatgrandmother and it listed their residence as Waikahalulu. Because of the proximity to his work, I assumed it was in the wailele area in Queen Liliʻuokalani Botanical Gardens near Nuʻuanu Stream. But now learning of these other traditional place names it makes me wonder because Momona’s known occupation was as a lei seller at the Honolulu Harbor. Their marriage is listed as September 21, 1866 and residence as Honolulu Wai ka Halulu.

Sig Zane is releasing a new design in a Kapoʻi Hoodie style called “Waikahalulu” Waikahalulu by Sig Zane from his Honolulu based location “Sig on Smith” this Friday, April 13 based on 1850s street maps of what is now modern day downtown Honolulu. His design honors the traditional name of the area between Fort and Richards where there was once a reef that was backfilled in the 1850s. According to Zane, it means “the roaring waters.”

A visit to the tranquil Nu’uanu Stream park off School Street near Waikahalulu Lane will lend a peaceful and oft times trickling stream or two over a ten foot cascade, but this vintage photo depicts the low but wide waterfall in more of a roar befitting its name.

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Visiting Kupuna

20 Feb

What should have been a simple Facebook video upload that didn’t work – forced me to finally take the leap into YouTube to share this my first public video – Kauhimaka Ohana Family Tour: Visiting Kupuna.  I’ll be adding future creations to my new ShakinTrees playlists.

I’ll be collaborating with other cousins who also captured video at our recent tour to create more videos about our talk story tour that went from 8:30am – 3:30pm Sunday, February 18, 2018.  Along with our Ohana matriarch, Winifred Jones – four generations of descendants of Joseph Kauhimaka and Sarah Kanohokai gathered for a tour to explore family roots in some of the places of significance.

It isn’t everyday that you get to visit with six Grandmothers in your family tree in one day – granted four of them are conveniently in one place at Ma’eMa’e Cemetery Chapel grounds.  I hope you’ll enjoy this and share your feedback with me.

Ma’eMa’e Sunday School Headstone Mapping & Transcriptions

22 Dec

Yesterday on a wet and rainy Puunui morning my helper and I visited my Grandparent’s grave at the former site of the Ma’eMa’e Sunday School. I have many fond memories of attending family functions, holiday potlucks, and Sunday School there. I miss the warmth of the pews; the Na Himeni bound in red dotting each row. I miss ringing the bell – its cheerful tone marking the start of another Sunday afternoon service. I miss the scent of the plumerias that used to shade my grandparent’s graves….removed I guess to make the landscaping and upkeep of the grounds fuss-free.

A surreal feeling envelopes you as you wander this tiny cemetary.  We took a brief shelter from the Nu’uanu rains under the last remaining large tree on the top side of the chapel.  Many of the Mahoe family are buried in this area of the grounds.  Kaumakapili Church Deacon Charles Mahoe started this sister chapel with his wife Haleaka. I understand the Ma’eMa’e bell is now at Kaumakapili and continues to be rung every Sunday.

Stairway to Nowhere

Stairways to Nowhere

The stark foundation and concrete steps leading to nowhere where the little green chapel in which my parents were married once stood till extreme winds blew down the 137 year old chapel in May 2000.  Orange “safety” netting now surrounds the stone foundation. Garish and out of place in this peaceful setting.

a fragment of the paint color still evident on this crawl space gate built into the stone foundation

Not only are my grandparent’s there, but also my great-grandparents Lino Fernandez, II and Phillipa Fernandez, great-great-grandparents Joseph & Sarah Kauhimaka, and great-great-great-grandmother Momona Kanohokai. Countless other aunts, uncles and close family ties surround.

In my last few visits there I’ve been working at photographing the headstones in the churchyard. With umbrella shielding the steady rain we added another 30 headstones to our growing collection of documentation yesterday morning. Many of the headstones are quite ornate with carvings and designs. Some with photos of the beloved, so haunting.  Ever more haunting the headstones of infants.

Findagrave.com lists 47 internments as of this writing — some of the transcription data is incorrect and doesn’t match headstone information however.  Many more of the memorials are not yet recorded there. I hope to get the information corrected and add the photos and memorials not yet on the grave search results.  I believe there are possibly many more internments for which no headstone remains…I’ve found some reports in turn of the century newspapers of folks being buried there and want to compare those names against the inventory and transcription of headstones I’m building…

My Grandparents Lino Fernandez, III and Marilyn Hann Jin (LEE) Fernandez

Today is my grandmother Marilyn Hann Jin (LEE) Fernandez’ birthday.  She would have been 91.  She died at an early age the day after her last child, my Uncle Lee, was born due to complications during delivery.  I’ve only ever known her from  photographs, other’s stories and memories, and my own quiet visits to her graveside through the years. She grew up nearby on Rooke Avenue and her mother and my grandfather’s mother were good friends at the Sunday School. It’s where they met and fell in love.

Visit: Ma’ema’e Chapel Cemetery – 401 Wyllie Street

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