Tag Archives: MaeMae

Baby Lino’s Loves and Legacy

2 Aug Lino Fernandez II & Phillipa Fernandez

The biography of my beloved Papa Lino Fernandez III was written in 2003 for sharing at the Kauhimaka Reunion held that year at Makaha resort.  I’ve updated the descendant counts….since the last 12 years the Lino & Marilyn Fernandez clan has been fruitful and multiplied.

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Biography of Lino Fernandez III – written by Lino Fernandez IV June 2003

BIRTH-
Lino Fernandez III, was born on May 21, 1920 to Lino and Phillipa Fernandez.  He was the sixth child and the fourth son.  He assumed the name Lino Fernandez Jr. when his father assumed the name Lino Fernandez Sr. after his father died.  He was also affectionately known as “Baby Lino”, dad, daddy, uncle Lino, grandpa, and papa.  According to his birth certificate, the family was living on Alewa Drive at the time of his birth.

SCHOOL-
He grew up in the Liliha, Kaimuki, and Punahou areas of Honolulu.   He attended public schools, and skipped a grade during his elementary school years.  As verified by his diplomas, he graduated from Liliuokalani Intermediate School in June of 1934 and McKinley High School in June of 1937, at age 17.   He excelled in school taking some business courses and attained the rank of Captain in JROTC.

Lino Fernandez III receives the NCO of the Year Award - Hawaii Air National Guard (IMG_1935)

Lino Fernandez III receives the NCO of the Year Award – Hawaii Air National Guard (IMG_1935)

WORK-
After high school he continued helping the family by selling papers for the ”Fernandez Newsboys” and working at Hawaiian Pine and for various construction companies.  He began working at Pearl Harbor Shipyard around 1940, and became a journeyman shipwright (carpenter). He along with some of his brothers served their country on December 7, 1941 aiding in emergency and firefighting work. He also served with the U.S. Merchant Marines sailing a couple of trips as an oiler/wiper. In 1949 he left Pearl Harbor and joined the Hawaii Air National Guard.  He was able to attend several service schools throughout the mainland and was also able to travel around the country.  He also attended a NCO Academy at Tachikawa AFB in Japan.  Lino was known as a very dedicated and helpful public servant in the Air Guard where he served as a full time technician for 21 years until he retired in September 1970. He was awarded The Outstanding NCO of the Year in 1968.  When he retired he was the Material Facilities (warehouse) Supervisor.  After retiring from the Air Guard he went to work for the State of Hawaii, (Department of Transportation, Highways Division), as part of the newly created Bridge Maintenance crew.  He retired from the State in May 1975.

FAMILY-
Lino married Marilyn Hann Jin Lee on July 26. 1941.   They met at MaeMae Sunday School where both of their families attended.  They first lived in the Fernandez Court on Metcalf  St., and in 1952 moved to the family home at St. Louis Hts. located at Alencastre Pl.  This house was built by Lino and his brothers.  They had four children Uarda Kanani (2/2/42), Lynette Lee Momona (4/13/44), Lino IV (11/20/47) and Lee Keolalani (6/17/58).  After Marilyn passed away Lino remarried
twice —  Harriet Napuunoa (1962) and Harriet Hisayo Rita (1969).

Lino passed away on Jan. 12, 1977, in his home at St. Louis Hts.  He is survived by his four children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren , and 12 great-grandchildren.

[UPDATE – July 2015 — He is survived by four children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren.]

PERSONALITY-
To summarize his life and personality I would like to share some of Lino’s Loves;

Loved his family; very caring, strict but fair,  always provided for his family.

Loved the Lord; attended Kaumakapili, and MaeMae, served as Trustee, sang in choir, helped with various projects i. e. luaus, carnivals, sweet bread and pickled onion sales.

Loved to read; Bible, newspapers, magazines to keep up with current events.

Loved sports; played football (H. S. and Air Guard), played softball (Hawaiian Pine, Air Guard and church), played golf, enjoyed watching sports, watched his sons play football, baseball and wrestle, watched high school , college (U. H.) and professional football games here in Hawaii and on the mainland (Kezar Stadium, S.F.), he also enjoyed watching sports on TV, he even played hooky from drill to watch the first “live” college game from the mainland.

Loved to party, hosted many family parties and also parties for his co-workers.

Loved to help others, he was always willing to help others with projects, church repairs, rental repairs, and helped several friend and family with repairs/remodels, helped on the kalua pig crew for many luaus.  He also helped in various community projects, including fund raising for the American Cancer Society, Heart Association, and Easter Seals.

Loved to counsel young people, he was very close to his troops from the Air Guard, he was proud to refer to them as “my boys”, he always treated them with respect and was able to get 100 % effort from them and he helped many of them with their training requirements for their jobs and also for personal matters.

He provided these same qualities to his family and can be remembered for always being willing to help us and being able to provide guidance.  He always had a good sense of humor and was very generous.  We surely miss him , hopefully some of his traits have carried on to his children and grandchildren.

Mahalo and Aloha to you dad.

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Research Ramblings – brick by brick and brick walls

28 Feb

Been busy with field research continuing at MaeMae Cemetery in Puunui. Nearly finished with photographing all the headstones and still have to transcribe to my spreadsheet. Then to compare to the items found in digital archives of other known burials to the site. Still need to map the stones and reach out to Kaumakapili Church to see what records and information they might have as well as sharing my research with them.

I’m also spending much time in Facebook Groups – like Helu Papa Kūʻauhau and also the Native Hawaiian Genealogy Society (NHGSoc) page. Another useful resource has been the group Portuguese Hawaiian Genealogy. The camaraderie of the groups is infectious and there are many ‘ohana connections.

Spent some time learning more of my North Carolina roots – and learned that some of my ancestors and family were brick makers and instrumental in building and supplying the brick for buildings like the Mills River Chapel Methodist church. The Chapel is one of a few antebellum churches in Henderson County and the only one used for worship since its construction. The King family farm passed this craft down through generations. Building more family history – brick by brick.

Looking forward to the Akana ‘Ohana reunion coming up in mid-July and will be returning to Hilo where my Great-Great-Grandparents Wong Sing Akana and Kaili Kaapuiki made their home. My Great-Grandmother Ami Akana Lee was the eldest child. It will be exciting to meet many distant cousins in person for the first time after months of corresponding online.

Finally a brick wall has been busted — and I’ll post a more detailed article about this find. In September, I discovered that Virginia K. Ayres – my husband’s great-grandmother – had a blood connection to the name KAMA. It turns out her birth father was known as Kama. Well I ran the search again on Chronicling America and a new article came up this time “Missing Girl has been found” … with his first name and the brother’s first name. Very exciting and now some concrete material to continue the search to find her blood kin and perhaps more of her story.

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